The Seventh Day Sabbath: A Christian Holy Day

What ever happened to the Seventh Day Sabbath? How is it that the majority of Christianity believes in following the Ten Commandments except the Fourth Commandment?

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant or your cattle or your sojourner who stays with you. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and made it holy.” (Exodus 20:8-11)

Isn’t it odd that the only commandment containing the word “remember” has largely been forgotten by most Christians? Learn more about the Holy Sabbath Day, how it applies to both Jew and Gentile, and explore some of the common scriptures and arguments used to suggest it has been ‘done away’ with…

The Seventh Day Sabbath

Shabbat Sabbath in the Old and New Testament

Shabbat (Sabbath) in the Old and New Testament

Even in traditional Christianity, there are Torah commandments which are honored in the church. Most Christians, for instance, accept the Ten Commandments. Therefore, they don’t murder or steal. They also believe that commandments which were given before the so-called Law of Moses (such as tithing) are valid, as well as any commandments which are repeated in the New Testament. An exception seems to be Shabbat – the Sabbath. Most Christians shun the Sabbath commandment, or else they transfer the holiness of the Sabbath to Sunday.
Shabbat: The First Appointed Time

Shabbat: The First Appointed Time

The first appointed time that the Lord prescribes is the Sabbath or Shabbat, opening the list seen in Leviticus 23: “For six days work may be done, but on the seventh day there is a sabbath of complete rest, a holy convocation. You shall not do any work; it is a sabbath to the LORD in all your dwellings” (Leviticus 23:3). It is the day of the week that God has made a holy convocation—a time for us to be in special fellowship with Him.
Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Many of today’s Christian laypersons, reading Romans 14, think that they automatically know what the circumstances being addressed are: the Apostle Paul does not consider matters of sacred days or eating to be that important any more. Romans 14:5-6 are quoted to Messianic Believers as an indication that not only are the days one celebrates as holy inconsequential to God, but so is what one eats likewise inconsequential. Messianic Believers can choose to keep Shabbat and the appointed times, and eat kosher, if they want to—but it is thought that these are no longer definite requirements for His people. These are now only matters of conscience that are to be left up to individual choice. Unfortunately, though, rather than letting Messianic Believers keep Shabbat, the appointed times, and a kosher diet without any interference or harassment, Romans 14:5-6 are verses often used to unfairly judge those of us who keep them—quite contrary to the tenor of what(ever) Paul says.
Are Sabbath and Feast Days separate?

Are Sabbath and Feast Days separate?

The typical nature of the annual feasts is also indicated by their parallel with the Sabbath in Leviticus 23. The chapter begins by introducing the “appointed feasts” (mo‘ed) to be observed. These consisted of the weekly Sabbath and the annual feasts, both of which are ordained as mo‘ed, “appointed feasts.” The term mo‘ed stresses the time set for the Sabbath and the feasts and is thus translated as “appointed feasts,” “set times,” or “set feasts.”
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