Romans 14:5-6 and the Feast Days:

“One person regards one day above another, another regards every day alike. Each person must be fully convinced in his own mind. He who observes the day, observes it for the Lord, and he who eats, does so for the Lord, for he gives thanks to God; and he who eats not, for the Lord he does not eat, and gives thanks to God.”

What are we to make of Romans 14:5-6 and the Feast Days (and Sabbath)? Are we free to choose how to worship God? At first glance it may seem as though Romans gives us the authority to choose how to worship God, and that one day isn’t really any different from the next. Is that what these verses mean? Did the Sabbath and Feast Days, which were appointed by God (Leviticus 23), somehow give way to our own desires, allowing us to determine what is sacred and holy? Learn more…

Romans 14:5-6 and the Feast Days:

Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Many of today’s Christian laypersons, reading Romans 14, think that they automatically know what the circumstances being addressed are: the Apostle Paul does not consider matters of sacred days or eating to be that important any more. Romans 14:5-6 are quoted to Messianic Believers as an indication that not only are the days one celebrates as holy inconsequential to God, but so is what one eats likewise inconsequential. Messianic Believers can choose to keep Shabbat and the appointed times, and eat kosher, if they want to—but it is thought that these are no longer definite requirements for His people. These are now only matters of conscience that are to be left up to individual choice. Unfortunately, though, rather than letting Messianic Believers keep Shabbat, the appointed times, and a kosher diet without any interference or harassment, Romans 14:5-6 are verses often used to unfairly judge those of us who keep them—quite contrary to the tenor of what(ever) Paul says.
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