Common Objections to the Feast Days:

Haven’t the Feast Days been ‘done away with’? Aren’t the Feasts of the LORD something that was ‘nailed to the cross’? What about the Apostle Paul? Didn’t he speak strongly against Christians keeping ‘days’ and judging others? Explore some of the more typical objections to the Christian observance of the Feast Days, and discover how the Feast Days reveal God’s plan for our salvation, through the redemptive work of Jesus Christ in His First and Second coming.

Colossians 2:14-16

What was 'nailed to the cross' in Colossians 2:14-17?

What was ‘nailed to the cross’ in Colossians 2:14-17?

To understand the legal language of Colossians 2:14 it is necessary, first of all, to grasp the arguments advanced by Paul in the preceding verses to combat the Colossian “philosophy.” We noticed that false teachers were “beguiling” (2:4) Christians to believe that the observance of “regulations– dogmata” was needed in order to court the protection of those cosmic beings who allegedly could help them to participate in the completeness and perfection of the divinity.
Colossians 2:16-17 and the Feast Days

Colossians 2:16-17 and the Feast Days

Colossians 2:16-17 is often employed to demonstrate that no one is permitted to judge Believers in relation to “eating or in drinking, or in respect of a feast, or of a new moon, or of sabbaths” (YLT). These things, as Paul writes, are “only shadows of the real thing, Christ himself” (NLT). Those who think that the Biblical holidays of Leviticus 23, the seventh-day Sabbath, and kosher dietary laws, have been done away, often use Colossians 2:16-17 as a proof text.

Galatians 4:9-10

Galatians 4:9-10 Common Objections to Feast Days Holy Days

Galatians 4:9-10 and the Feast Days

These verses, from Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians, are part of a grossly misunderstood letter that is often not interpreted by Christian laypersons in light of Yeshua’s words regarding: (1) The fact that the relevance of the Torah still stands (Matthew 5:17-19), (2) The later Jerusalem Council ruling of Acts 15:19-21 of how the non-Jews coming to faith were anticipated to go to the local synagogue and hear Moses’ Teaching, and (3) That the Galatians were relatively new Believers who were being (easily) led astray by outsiders using a position of perceived importance to exert ungodly influences.

Ephesians 2:14-15

The 'Wall of Separation' in Ephesians 2:14

The ‘Wall of Separation’ in Ephesians 2:14

The unity Paul speaks of is inclusive (“How do we include everybody?”), not exclusive (“What people do we need to kick out?”). In Ephesians 2, what was the “law of commandment” and the “wall of separation”, and what was abolished by Jesus? How to work toward unity today. Roles of the leaders toward unity. Unity by coercion will not last; authoritarianism divides and is contrary to the Ephesian instruction. Every joint has its role – no exclusiveness.
Ephesians 2:14-15: What has been abolished?

Ephesians 2:14-15: What has been abolished?

Ephesians 2:14-15 are challenging verses for many within the Messianic movement, with few being able to even respond to the pastor’s remark “The Law was abolished in the flesh of Christ.” If in Ephesians 2:14-15 the Apostle Paul is saying that Yeshua the Messiah abolished the Torah of Moses, then this would be in flat contradiction of the Savior’s own words regarding fulfillment of the Torah (Matthew 5:17-19)—yet no one can deny the significance of how in Him a “one new humanity” (NRSV/CJB/TNIV) composed of Jewish and non-Jewish Believers must emerge, a clear testament of His grand salvation for all people. We need to look at Ephesians 2:14- 15 a bit more closely, and keep in mind what kind of law is being specifically addressed here. Is God’s Torah actually a cause of enmity or hostility for people, or might something else be in mind?

Romans 14:5-6

Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Feast Days and the Sabbath in Romans 14:5-6

Many of today’s Christian laypersons, reading Romans 14, think that they automatically know what the circumstances being addressed are: the Apostle Paul does not consider matters of sacred days or eating to be that important any more. Romans 14:5-6 are quoted to Messianic Believers as an indication that not only are the days one celebrates as holy inconsequential to God, but so is what one eats likewise inconsequential. Messianic Believers can choose to keep Shabbat and the appointed times, and eat kosher, if they want to—but it is thought that these are no longer definite requirements for His people. These are now only matters of conscience that are to be left up to individual choice. Unfortunately, though, rather than letting Messianic Believers keep Shabbat, the appointed times, and a kosher diet without any interference or harassment, Romans 14:5-6 are verses often used to unfairly judge those of us who keep them—quite contrary to the tenor of what(ever) Paul says.

Other common objections against the Feast Days:

Were the Feast Days terminated at the cross?

Were the Feast Days terminated at the cross?

The prevailing view among Christians today is that the annual feasts were strictly socio-ceremonial institutions given to Israel. Their function terminated at the Cross with all the sacrificial system of Biblical and Festival Typology the Old Testament. I must admit that I subscribed to this view until I became involved in this research. It came as a surprise to me to discover that the feasts were designed by God, not only to meet the socio-religious needs of the Jews, but also to foreshadow the unfolding of salvation history until its consummation. This suggests that while the sacrificial, ceremonial aspects of the feasts terminated at the Cross, their typological function continues in the Christian church, though with a new meaning and relevance.
Are Sabbath and Feast Days separate?

Are Sabbath and Feast Days separate?

The typical nature of the annual feasts is also indicated by their parallel with the Sabbath in Leviticus 23. The chapter begins by introducing the “appointed feasts” (mo‘ed) to be observed. These consisted of the weekly Sabbath and the annual feasts, both of which are ordained as mo‘ed, “appointed feasts.” The term mo‘ed stresses the time set for the Sabbath and the feasts and is thus translated as “appointed feasts,” “set times,” or “set feasts.”
Feast Days without sacrifices?

Feast Days without sacrifices?

Many Christians do struggle with the issue of keeping the Lord’s appointed times or moedim, either by wanting to act as though they were important only for a previous time, or they keep them at a spiritual arm’s length. Yet, it is undeniable that one of the significant ways that today’s Messianic movement has utterly ballooned in number, is because evangelical Believers have been drawn to the richness of keeping the appointed times in Messiah Yeshua. Others have noticed this, and have not been too positive in their assessment of it. Consider the following quote by author Tim Warner, a fundamentalist Christian, of The Last Trumpet website. He says the following in his article “Christians, and the Feasts of Israel”: “Lets [sic] get one thing straight right up front. Keeping the Feasts according to the Torah REQUIRES OFFERING ANIMAL SACRIFICES. There is no avoiding this conclusion. And, any changes to the festivals by rabbis to accommodate the fact that there is no longer a Tabernacle/Temple or Levitical priesthood, or, any changes by Messianic Christians to accommodate the fact that the New Testament says Christ’s sacrifice has ended the animal sacrifices, makes it impossible to observe these feasts according to the Torah.”
Feast Days only in Jerusalem?

Feast Days only in Jerusalem?

It is fair to say that God was not to be worshiped in a haphazard fashion. He was quite explicit in revealing to man how, when, and where He was to be worshiped. The where of that worship is a matter of particular interest. Contrary to assumptions, the law does not specify Jerusalem. The Israelites were told, “Three times in a year shall all your males appear before the Lord your God in the place which He shall choose; in the Feast of Unleavened Bread, and in the Feast of Weeks, and in the Feast of Tabernacles” (Deuteronomy 16:16). Once Israel had entered the land and the tabernacle was placed in Shiloh, the people went up to Shiloh to observe the three “pilgrimage festivals.” Later, the Ark was in the City of David, and when the Temple was built it was moved to Jerusalem, and the festivals were held there.
Share This